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General Discussion / Re: Updates.
« Last post by Wolfwood on Today at 11:50:31 AM »
Phew Animal husbandry AND regular husbandry lol good job sounds like a nice setup congratulations!
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General Discussion / Updates.
« Last post by Dcav on February 18, 2018, 09:48:44 AM »
Morning,


Been quite awhile since i visited.  Since moving to DFW, we have bought a small 5 acre farm/house.  Have a pair of Palomino horses, 25 odd chickens, 2 huge geese, and 3 ducks.  Newest addition is 5 guinea hens which are the loudest dang birds.  Also expecting our first child in June, so I've been busy!!!  Will be back on here regularly as much as possible. Been missing out on the shooting sports for sure.
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Speaking of shotguns, which is along this same topic, 4 years ago I was present at some ballistic testing for the State. The test firearm was a normal Rem 870 with a full choke, no rifling but the shotgun had a scope on it. As I recall, a 3- 9 scope. The target was 100 yds. This was ammo prepped by the Barnes folks. The shooter shot a 1" group with this 12 ga shotgun using a slug. Again, no rifling, a smooth bore. I would have never believed a non rifled barrel would ever produce that kind of accuracy. Frankly, I had my doubts about it hitting the 36" square target. The projectile goes along the same theory about stabilization doesn't mean you have to spin it. There are other ways to get the same stabilization. We also tested some ammo I put together involving saboted slugs. Again, accuracy was far better than expected especially with a smooth bore barrel.

In shooting the 1000 yd game,there are a lot of cartridges that can't go that distance even with a rifled barrel. It has more to do with retained velocity and bullet design. Any lever rifle would be a poor choice due to the bullet design required for the tube mag. But once the bullet falls sub sonic, it loses it's gyroscopic stability. Some of the long distance bullet designs you see today are designed just for being stable once it falls sub sonic. The  105gr 6mm VLD was among the first for that game. But not just everything will shoot the long range game. I played the 880yd game for decades it seems with a Rem 40X 30/338mag using a custom designed bullet from Olin that weighted in at 190gr. Key was a consistent 2700'ps muzzle speed. Groups of under 4" were common at 880yds. I always wanted but never had the opportunity to shoot the mile. I have buds that shoot that game in Kentucky.
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Here's a thought would this maybe count as rifling enough to allow those shotgun revolvers to pattern halfway decent? Or would it change them to AOWs
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Yeah.....but you ain't gonna get that accuracy out to 1k yards with the same ballistic coefficients that you will with rifled guns.  I realize that any gun made after 1903 is still uber-modern to you, but......
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The early rockets like the V2 did not having moving fins and neither did some of our NASA rockets. It did however carry an adjusting exhaust for guidance.  There's a reason that the bombs you dad road with during WWII had fins on the tailend of those bombs- stability. During the early development of rifles, the smooth bore was the common barrel. The French came up with a bullet that loaded just like any other muzzleloader but the base of the bullet was concave. Doesn't look like any big deal but as the bullet came out of the barrel, the gases behind it would actually open the thin part of the bullet at the tailing edge causing drag at the rear of the bullet. Accuracy was greatly improved with man size shots at 800 yds all but guaranteed with the right firearm and shooter. I've always been amazed at the early firearms, some of which are incredibly accurate like the Whitworths that the Confederates used as a sniper rifle. Cost the south a smooth 10,000.00 for one...and that's 1865 dollars.
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We've all been trained or conditioned to think that accuracy can ONLY be had with the correct amount of spin or imparted gyroscopic stability added to the flight of the bullet. According to these guys, there are other ways to get the stability without the spin. Lets think about rockets. They don't spin at any appreciable rate. So how do they manage to hit a postage stamp size target at miles? They use the fins at the tail of the rocket to create enough drag that adds to the stability. That's just one way and there are several others that they talked about.

And those fins move to allow for course corrections.  Gonna make for a purty expensive boolit, ah think.......
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 :PThey actually are working on finned projectiles. Which could be interesting- but forget about casting your own. Sound alike they will be individually cnc'd. Can't imagine what the price per round will be for loaded carts.

Also I posted earlier or thought I did that it has 2 things imo going for it. It is A-very good looking. And B- points out the extreme silliness of some of our regulations. The question is whether or not looking slick and making a point outweigh twisted rifling and the price tag.

The decreased friction is a neat thought though I hadn't thought of that. If these guys started out trying to make a gun to keep the ATF regs happy and ended up discovering the next step in ballistics technology... That would be pretty funny I think.

I wonder where I posted that other response.
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We've all been trained or conditioned to think that accuracy can ONLY be had with the correct amount of spin or imparted gyroscopic stability added to the flight of the bullet. According to these guys, there are other ways to get the stability without the spin. Lets think about rockets. They don't spin at any appreciable rate. So how do they manage to hit a postage stamp size target at miles? They use the fins at the tail of the rocket to create enough drag that adds to the stability. That's just one way and there are several others that they talked about.
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Think about it....twist rate is needed for accuracy - without it, I can't imagine it maintaining a stable trajectory.  They rifled cannons for a reason...... :D
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