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1
General / Re: This Old Military Rifle
« Last post by TexasRedneck on March 11, 2019, 07:29:15 PM »
The Eddystone's are all gone....sorry!
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General / Re: This Old Military Rifle
« Last post by Henry Bowman on March 06, 2019, 10:30:14 PM »
I paid $750.00 for mine a couple of years ago......was happy to pay for an unmolested non-import....without the bayonet...
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General / Re: This Old Military Rifle
« Last post by TexasRedneck on March 06, 2019, 10:09:40 PM »
What is the average price on those now ?

I'll check and let you know.....
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General / Re: This Old Military Rifle
« Last post by 308nato on March 06, 2019, 08:21:32 PM »
Thanks for that!  We got a bunch of 'em in at the shop from an estate - folks just aren't as interested in the old war-horses as they once were - it's a shame.



What is the average price on those now ?
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General / Re: This Old Military Rifle
« Last post by TexasRedneck on March 06, 2019, 07:25:15 AM »
Thanks for that!  We got a bunch of 'em in at the shop from an estate - folks just aren't as interested in the old war-horses as they once were - it's a shame.
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Long Guns for Sale / Re: Norinco underfolder - in .223
« Last post by TexasRedneck on March 06, 2019, 07:20:30 AM »
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General / Re: This Old Military Rifle
« Last post by Henry Bowman on March 05, 2019, 02:02:16 PM »
US Model 1917..........

 In April 1917....the U.S. Government was realizing the the U.S was going to get actively involved in WWI. While the M1903 was standard issue of the time for U.S. forces, there wasn't enough of them for the coming call to war. Only about 600,000 were available......woefully short of the numbers going to be needed. While Springfield ramped up production, they would not be able to fill the needed rifles in time. Rock Island, who had all but stopped M1903 production attempted to rebound production but were hampered by inexperienced personnel and raw materials. The 30/40 Krag was taken out of storage and used primarily for training. While the U.S. could start new production facilities for the M1903, there just wasn't wasn't time.

Winchester, Remington and Eddystone (an affiliate of Remington) were producing the Enfield Pattern 1914 British model in .303 British in large numbers for the British Government. So it made sense to U.S. officials for them to continue the rifle production with some changes. One of the most stark changes in the rifle would be the adoption of the 30-06 cartridge instead of the .303 British cartridge. Many thought the 30-06 was superior to the .303 and it would simplify not having two different cartridges in the field.

The adopted rifle would have the nomenclature: U.S. Rifle, Caliber .30, Model of 1917. Some still today refer to it as the P17 or Pattern 17. That is undeniably incorrect. The Pattern 1914 bayonet was also adopted by the United States as the Bayonet, Model of 1917. The bayonets were manufactured by Winchester and Remington, but, none were made by Eddystone. No one knows why. Some of the Pattern 1914 bayonets made for the British were procured by the U.S. military and over-stamped with American ordnance markings.


Both the Model 1917 and Model 1903 rifles were bolt-actions, but there were differences in the design and operation of each. Most apparent was the Model 1917’s aperture rear sight, which was mounted above the receiver and located closer to the eye than the ’03’s barrel-mounted, folding-leaf Model 1905 sight. The crooked bolt handle was another and the rifle was cocked on closing the bolt instead of opening as with the M1903. No magazine cut off on the M1917 like the M1903 either. The Model 1917 remained in production until mid-1919, by which time a total of 2,422,529 rifles had been manufactured.

During World War II, the Model 1917s were called back into service and used by theU.S. for training purposes and limited use as supplementary service rifles. Also, large quantities were distributed to some the allied nations under various military aid programs. Some were offered through the DCM program. Due to the large amount of rifles given to allied nations and the practice of sporterizing by hunters, resulted in unmolested Model 1917 rifles being somewhat scarce compared to the actual number of rifles manufactured.

My rifle was rearsenaled in the San Antonio Army Depot. Interesting that I bought the rifle in New Hampshire.

There is a lot of interesting history on this rifle.......














 
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General / Re: This Old Military Rifle
« Last post by 308nato on March 03, 2019, 06:53:23 PM »
That is a very interesting looking rifle as I have never seen one before.
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General / Re: This Old Military Rifle
« Last post by Henry Bowman on March 03, 2019, 05:59:09 PM »
The Hakim Rifle..........

Egyptian made variation of the Swedish Ag M/42 Ljungman rifle (6.5X55 caliber). Egypt had a large amount of 8mm surplus lying around and when they wanted to upgrade to semi automatic rifles, bought the tooling and rights for the rifle from Sweden. About 70 thousand rifles were produced along with smaller numbers of a shorter carbine version the Rasheed in 7.62X39. Because of the inconsistency of their various manufactured 8mm surplus ammo, they designed the rifle with an adjustable gas system (impingement) the Swedish rifle did not have. American buyers of the surplus Hakim rifles quickly discovered that improper adjustment of this gas system could have catastrophic consequences upon firing the rifle. Often misdiagnosed as out of battery firing. The gas system is adjustable without taking the rifle apart. The tipping bolt design is also similar in design to the SKS, the FN49 and the French MAS 49. They  were produced in the 50's and 60's. Hakim thumb is as painful if not more so than Garand thumb for those not familiar with the design. The Hakim was eventually replaced by the MAADI Rifle (AK-47) in the mid 60's. Replacement parts are somewhat hard to come by now. I am missing the front stock band on my rifle. It was replaced by a non original band so that the bayonet lug could be removed. I found the lug eventually, and am currently still looking for the front band.

The 10 round mag is standard and originals command a premium for collectors. MG13 25 round mags can be modified to fit and I have two original and two MG13 mags for my rifle. Changing the mag is not very quick as designed, imho...the muzzle brake (non removable) is effective and yes.....loud. The bayonet attachment is a little weird too......Prices have been rising recently with the best example fetching 1k or better...other Countries the Hakim have been used is South Yemen and Tunisia.......

The Hakim is classified as C&R and makes a fine addition to any military collection.

My apologies for the cell phone pics and background. I did this one from home and did not have access to my usual camera and background...













 
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Long Guns for Sale / Re: Norinco underfolder - in .223
« Last post by Fuelfather on March 02, 2019, 07:32:58 PM »
I got $100
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